Fun With Poetry (And Invisible Ink) – D&D Style

So my friends and I have been playing Dungeons and Dragons since August. The campaign is going well, and the game has been amazing. The players do so many things which I, the DM, am unprepared for, which is great because it keeps me on my toes and forces the narrative to be fluid. It is the ultimate Pantser experience.

Tonight, depending on how things go, our party will reach the crucial point of their quest. They’ve been searching for a scroll that contains the directions for finding the greatest treasure on earth. They will ply through a ruined city, fighting against the creatures of the desolation and the toxic winds. When (if) they reach the scroll tonight, sadly, their hearts will be broken.

The scroll will be blank, in the game as well as the one I hand to them. Yes, they will receive a physical copy. The trick, my friends, is a little homemade invisible ink. The answer will be there in front of them, and they won’t see it.

I’ve got subtle guides to see if they can figure it out, such as leading statements about seeing things in the heat, etc. But if they don’t figure it out, the ramifications will be dire.I was happy with the ominous letter, and because you all are not yet fully sharing little adventure (I am wayyy behind on the installments), I wanted to go ahead and share it with you.

*

Turn not the key of riches great

Nor pull it from it from its stand

The wealth lies not in jewels and plate

But in the lives of man

Without the key the sky will burn

And earth shall quake with dread

The key locks up what skeptics spurn

The fiends of hell, the dead

*

The trick is that the ‘key’ is the sword that one of them captured from a fallen foe. They will go into battle with the enemy, not realizing the sword can end it all…and if they return home with their ‘blank’ scroll, defeated, then the world itself is in peril

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